2 Practical Ways to Figure GPA on the Homeschool Transcript

Here are 2 practical ways to figure GPA on the homeschool transcript.

Figure GPA on the Homeschool Transcript

Figure GPA on the Homeschool Transcript

Homeschool parents consistently send us this question: How do I determine my homeschool high schooler’s GPA?

We understand. It is a mysterious process (and one that can be done in several different ways). We don’t know why it is mysterious! All high school transcripts need a GPA, so why is it difficult to find information? We don’t know but we do know that you can do it! If you’ve been worrying about GPA for your teens’ transcripts, take heart: It is not that hard!

The first thing you need to know is that there is not ONE right way to assign a GPA. We’ll share 2 practical ways.

Step 1: Determine which percentage points determine the letter grades

This is important because you need the letter grade to figure the GPA. (Also, college applications often ask this.)

You get to decide this; there is not a standard.

A simple method (This is the method used by the homeschool umbrella school that the 7Sisters’s homeschoolers have attended. It is based on several decades of observing student capabilities and college admissions.):

  • Lowest B=  82
  • Lowest C=  73
  • Lowest A=  92

A more complex method could be:

  • Lowest A=    93
  • Lowest A= 97
  • Lowest A-=  90
  • Lowest B+= 87
  • Lowest B=    83
  • Lowest B-=  80
  • Lowest C+= 77
  • Lowest C=    73
  • Lowest C-=  70
  • Lowest D+= 67
  • Lowest D=    63
  • Lowest D-=  60

(I personally don’t recommend allowing a homeschool high schooler any credit for a grade lower than a C-.

There cannot be mastery of a subject with a low grade. I would have the student re-take the course. This, however, is a matter of opinion.)

You may be wondering about *weighting* the Grade Points. Here is a post that explains.

Figure GPA on the Homeschool Transcript

Step 2: Assign a Grade Point to each course

Again, the simple method (used by the homeschool umbrella school that the 7Sisters’s homeschoolers have attended):

  • Lowest A= 92= 4
  • Lowest B= 82= 3
  • Lowest C= 73= 2

Again, the more complex method could be. (These is no set standard for Grade Points, there are many variations.)

  • Lowest A+= 97=4.0
  • Lowest A=    93=3.8
  • Lowest A-=  90=3.6
  • Lowest B+= 87=3.4
  • Lowest B=    83=3.2
  • Lowest B-=  80=3.0
  • Lowest C+= 77=2.8
  • Lowest C=    73=2.4
  • Lowest C-=  70=2.0
  • Lowest D+= 67=1.8
  • Lowest D=    63=1.4
  • Lowest D-=  60=1.0

Step 3: Assign the amount of credit earned to each course on the transcript

Use this post to help you determine the number of credits.

Figure GPA on the Homeschool Transcript
Step 4: Figure the GPA

This is simple math. You are simply going to average of the Grade Points. Do this by:

  1. Adding together all the Grade Points earned in a year.
  2. Adding the number of credits earned in a year.
  3. Dividing the Grade Points by the number of credits earned.

At our umbrella school, we only counted the core courses as part of the GPA. The course courses are:

  • Language Arts
  • Mathematics
  • Social Studies/Histories
  • Sciences
  • World Languages

Here’s an example, Sally’s 9th grade core courses looked like this:

  • American Literature 1 credit, A grade, 4 GP
  • Algebra I                      1 credit, B grade, 3 GP
  • American History      1 credit, A grade, 4 GP
  • Physical Science         1 credit, A grade, 4 GP
  • Spanish I                      1 credit, A grade, 4 GP
  • Sally’s total GP was 19. She earned 5 credits.

19/5=3.8

For more on GPAs and transcripts check out our Authoritative Guide to Transcripts post and download our easy, editable transcript with how-tos. 

For more on GPA’s check out 3 things to know about GPAs post.

We recently found a GPA calculator that is free. You can check it out. Also, English/Language Arts is a complex credit and can be confusing when trying to figure out what to do with it on the homeschool transcript, we have tips for handling ELA for you in this post.

Remember, there’s not one right way to figure the GPA, so do what is best for your family. Our college-bound teens have done fine with the simple method, but the more complex one may be more suitable for your family. Either way, you will probably be explaining your methodology on the college application (or the *counselor* portion of the application).

 

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2 Practical Ways to Figure GPA on the Homeschool Transcript

Vicki Tillman

Blogger, curriculum developer at 7SistersHomeschool.com, counselor, life and career coach, SYMBIS guide, speaker, prayer person. 20+year veteran homeschool mom.

2 Replies to “2 Practical Ways to Figure GPA on the Homeschool Transcript”

  1. Hi There,
    I would suggest you talk to the folks who are offering the GED. It may replace your need for a transcript so you won’t have to mess with it. It might do you good to see what you actually did accomplish during high school, though. If you gather all your materials and go through them to see what you finished, you can construct a transcript or create a master portfolio. Check this post on how to earn credits: How to Earn Credits for High School Transcript
    and this one on master portfolios.See what can do with all these. Then feel free to contact me again.

  2. I have some questions about Figuring out your GPA score, but need to explain my situation first:
    My studies have been quite disorganized with large gaps in which I studied nothing;
    I’ve been homeschooled all my childhood (independent from any homeschool groups), and don’t have a good record of my studies–some of my schoolwork is intact, but none of it is graded yet;
    I am preparing for the GED test, which I hope to take this or next year. If feasible I might enroll in a college.

    Does the GED test results count into the GPA score? And is it acceptable to base the GPA solely on those results?
    How do I count years I didn’t study or don’t have record of (not with an F, right?)? Do I simply derive average grade score from what I do have?
    How much detail would you be expected to give when explaining your grading methed? Do you have to give a year-by-year record or just a simple “this percent means this grades means this score”, such as the one given in this article?

    Sorry if this was only partially related to this post, but I appreciate any help you can give.

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