Excerpt from Introduction to Psychology from a Christian Perspective

This is an excerpt from Introduction to Psychology from a Christian Perspective, 2020 edition. Note that the images are slightly blurred on purpose. This helps protect copyrighted material.

7Sisters Introduction to Psychology follows the philosophy of 7Sisters curriculum: no-busywork and adaptable to different levels of rigor, according to each teens’ interests, needs and goals. (The Psych textbook includes a chart with instructions for “leveling up credit to Honors” in meaningful ways that build each teen’s specific interests.)

The text is written in an engaging and friendly tone that an average high schooler can understand and enjoy but not be insulting to a teen who is used to rigorous reading. Our goal is that each homeschool high schooler can “like Psych“.

Get some engaging enrichment activities for Psychology in this episode of Homeschool Highschool Podcast.


Introduction to Psychology

Excerpt from Introduction to Psychology from a Christian Perspective

The following are pictures of the actual pages in the PDF download. If you have any further questions please contact us!

We have the following blog posts to help:

Please note curriculum excerpts are intentionally sloppy copies to discourage copyright violations. Purchased curriculum displays crystal clear.

Allison Thorp

28 Replies to “Excerpt from Introduction to Psychology from a Christian Perspective”

  1. Hi there, I just enrolled for the online Psychology course. Do we need to purchase and download the curriculum as well to go along with the online course if we are using it for credit? Thank you!

  2. I’d like to purchase your curriculum and teach it in a co-op. Do I just order the e-book and it will explain everything?

  3. I’m seeing glowing reviews about this curriculum, but can someone explain what Christian world view means when talking about psychology? I’m wondering what the views on LGBTQIA+ are and how up to date the info in your curriculum is with the DSM 5th edition.

    • Hi Samantha,
      Good questions. We strive in the text to present information from a Christian worldview: not preachy or demanding or telling young people how to live their lives, but from a viewpoint that God created us and that’s a cool thing. The newest edition of the curriculum is updated to DSMV.
      We did not at all discuss gender issues. One simply cannot hit everything in an introductory high school curriculum. While DSMV discusses Gender Dysphoria as a diagnosis, the idea of gender identity even being a diagnosis rather than a choice or biology is a fraught topic. Since we only had one chapter to spend on Abnormal Psychology, we spent a lot of time on the issues such as depression, anxiety, eating disorders, etc.

    • Hi Tasha,
      This is an introductory course, and while it covers the basic scope and sequence that your teen might find on CLEP, it is not meant to be a CLEP-prep course. Rather, the goal is to give teens a good understanding from a Christian worldview of the basics of psychology. As with any subject, we always suggest that if your goal is CLEP-prep, that you purchase an actual CLEP-prep workbook in addition to the basic curriculum, so that teens are familiar with the question style and vocabulary of the actual CLEP test.

  4. Mental retardation, listed on page 79 of YOUR textbook, has negative connotations. DSM5 and many entities, including the US goverment, have changed this wording to intellectual disabilities.

    • Hi April,
      We totally agree with you. The term “mental retardation” is not used in our textbook. There is another textbook by another publisher that has the same title as ours. I imagine you are looking at that text, not ours. You might be interested to know that our latest edition of the text will be released soon and is aligned with DSM5 and ICD10.

      • I’m not clear – in your excerpt shown above, Homework question 2 says “mental retardation.” Isn’t this excerpt from your materials?

        • Interesting, Jen. That must has slipped our notice from the first edition long ago, when that was the standard terminology. We do emphatically agree that that terminology is inappropriate for this time. BTW- the editors are finishing the final touches on a new edition that is congruent with the DSMV and ICD-10 terminology.

        • So sorry to have an outdated homework page showing in the excerpt. Vicki is right; the DSM changed the terminology in 2013, and we updated our curriculum accordingly, but failed to update this excerpt image. Thanks for helping us catch and correct the error!

  5. The idea of video content to enhance the text sounds amazing! I hope this becomes a reality. 🙂

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