How to Earn an ELA Credit for Poetry

By request: How to Earn an ELA Credit for Poetry.

How to Earn a Full ELA Credit for Poetry. For teens who want a poetry ELA or elective credit, here's a syllabus .

How to Earn an ELA Credit for Poetry

Poetry has become a popular topic with a number of teens these days. This is great because poetry can do so much for teens:

Some years ago, some homeschool high schoolers came to me and asked if they could earn a full credit of poetry for their English/Language Arts credit. They wanted a class format, but I’ll share with you what we did so you can do this with your homeschool high schooler or homeschool co-op.

So here is a suggested syllabus you can adapt to your needs (and your teens’ needs) that will pull together an interesting and inspiring Poetry credit (for English/Language Arts credit or an ELA elective).

Tips on How to Earn an ELA Credit for Poetry

Here are some things the homeschool parent needs to know:

Books and papers

Teens can make an entire Language Arts credit covered by a single topic such as poetry. This takes a little creativity since a full Language Arts credit requires some books and papers. The number of books to read and papers to write will vary by teen’s age and goals (the highlighted posts will help you decide).

The workbooks in this course will be counted as books for the booklist:

  • Introductory Guide to Poetry Writing
  • Intermediate Guide to Poetry Writing
  • British Poetry
  • Advanced Guide to Poetry Writing
  • Ol’ Possums Book of Practical Cats
  • American Poetry: Reading and Writing
  • World Poetry: Reading and Writing
  • Poetry Analysis

Traditionally, an English/Language Arts credit includes: Poetry, Short Story, Essays and Research Paper.

  • In this course, students write volumes of poetry, thus the workbooks will count for the Poetry, Short Story and Essays. The final unit of the year is Poetry Analysis. The assignments in this book will be gathered as a Research Paper.

Recording the credit

If your teens choose to earn a poetry credit, you can go about recording that the credit was earned in a couple of ways. Choose the one that is best for your teens.

  • Follow the syllabus, this will easily cover the scope and sequence of a poetry credit.
    • Be sure to keep a copy of the syllabus (it has a course description, which your teens might need). If your teens are leveling up to Honors credit in poetry be sure they understand what to do for the extra work needed to add rigor for that credit.
  • Log hours to earn the credit using your state’s requirements for earning a Carnegie-hour credit.
    • One credit courses tend to vary by state from 120-180 hours of educational experience. One-half credit courses tend to include 60-90 hours of educational experience.
    • Honors credit is double the hours.

Grading poems, poetry lessons and poetry-topic papers

Use the rubrics in the guides, or the suggested rubric and guidelines for grading poetry in this post. Adapt these to your needs. It might help to take into consideration my view on grading poetry: I want teens to:

  • Have fun
  • Follow directions
  • Be inspired
  • Stretched gently
  • Gain confidence
  • Have fun

So these values will guide the “subjective points” (parts of the rubric or extra credit) when I figure out the grades. You can set some values for your teens’ learning and your grading.

More on the Scope and Sequence of a full poetry credit in this post.

Syllabus for Poetry Studies

This is a one-credit course where the student explores reading, watching, writing and memorizing poetry. 

Texts

Resources

Poetry Collections

Choose from the list below or choose a poet’s collection of your choice (note these can be obtained at the library or booksellers- we are Amazon affiliates):

NOTE: Poetry collections by a single author are usually 30-50 poems, so you can count a “100 Best Anthology” as two books for your booklist.

Unit 1: Poetry Credit Weeks 1-5: 7Sisters Introductory Guide to High School Poetry Writing

This no-busywork guide is a gentle introduction to writing poetry that will inspire you that you CAN write poetry (and enjoy the process). This guide introduces basic poetry-writing concepts.

You will read a poetry book for each unit. Read several poems per day to get through one of the poetry books listed above (or feel free to choose a collection of your own).

Daily assignments are listed in the guide.

Unit 2: Poetry Credit Weeks 6-11: Intermediate Guide to High School Poetry Writing

This guide builds on the basic skills of Weeks 1-5 and eases into the basics of poetry analysis.

You will read a poetry book for each unit. Read several poems per day to get through one of the poetry books listed above (or feel free to choose a collection of your own).

Daily assignments are listed in the guide.

Unit 3: Poetry Credit Weeks 7-13: Literature Guide to British Poetry

Build some poetry analysis skills while you work through Literature Guide to British Poetry. You will put to use the skills you learned in Intermediate Guide to Poetry Writing by looking at a few favorite poems by a few favorite British poets.

You will read a poetry book for each unit. Read several poems per day to get through one of the poetry books listed above (or feel free to choose a collection of your own).

Daily assignments are listed in the guide.

You can break the lessons like this:

Unit 4: Poetry Credit Weeks 14-18: Advanced Guide to High School Poetry Writing

Build more poetry-analysis and poetry-writing skills with this guide.

You will read a poetry book for each unit. Read several poems per day to get through one of the poetry books listed above (or feel free to choose a collection of your own).

Daily assignments are listed in the guide.

Unit 5: Poetry Credit Weeks 19-23: American Poetry: Reading and Writing

You will apply your poetry-writing and analysis skills in this inspiring, no-busywork overview of American Poetry. You will read a few poems from five American poetry genres, apply simple analysis skills and then write a poem of your own in the style of each genre.

You will read a poetry book for each unit. Read several poems per day to get through one of the poetry books listed above (or feel free to choose a collection of your own).

Daily assignments are listed in the guide.

Unit 6: Poetry Credit Weeks 24-28: World Poetry: Reading and Writing

World Poetry follows the same format as American Poetry: Reading and Writing but gives an introduction to several poetic styles from around the world.

You will read a poetry book for each unit. Read several poems per day to get through one of the poetry books listed above (or feel free to choose a collection of your own).

Daily assignments are listed in the guide.

Unit 7: Poetry Credit Weeks 29-30: Literature Study Guide for Old Possum’s Guide to Practical Cats

Take a break from the writing and delve into this fun classic using your poetry analysis skills.

You will read a poetry book for each unit. Read several poems per day to get through one of the poetry books listed above (or feel free to choose a collection of your own).

Daily assignments are listed in the guide.

  • Week 29: Naming of Cats, Gumbie Cat, Growltiger’s Last Stand, Rum Tum Tugger, Jellicles, Mungojerrie and Rumpleteaser, Old Deuteronomy
  • Week 30: Of the Awful Battle of the Pekes and the Pollicles, together with some account of the Participation of the Pugs and Poms, and the Intervention of THE GREAT RUMPUSCAT, Mister Mistoffelees, Macavity, Gus, Bustopher Jones, Skimbleshanks, The Ad-dressing of Cats, Cat Morgan Introduces Himself

Unit 8: Poetry Analysis Weeks 31-35 (Course to be released in Spring, 2022)

Go deeper with poetry analysis skill development but still have fun!

You will read a poetry book for each unit. Read several poems per day to get through one of the poetry books listed above (or feel free to choose a collection of your own).

Daily assignments are listed in the guide.

Congratulations! You have completed your credit!

How to Earn an ELA Credit for Poetry

 

Vicki Tillman

Blogger, curriculum developer at 7SistersHomeschool.com, counselor, life and career coach, SYMBIS guide, speaker, prayer person. 20+year veteran homeschool mom.

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