How to Homeschool High School: How to Record ELA on the Transcript

By request: How to Homeschool High School: How to Record ELA on the Transcript.

How to Homeschool High School: How to Record ELA on the Transcript

How to Homeschool High School: How to Record ELA on the Transcript

We occasionally get questions about recording English/Language Arts on the homeschool transcript. There are two reasons for the concern that these parents have about getting it right:

Some states’ graduation requirements include specifically showing: American Literature, World Literature, British Literature on the homeschool transcript. Some do not need specific English/Language Arts credits, they simply require four ELA credits of any kind.

A few colleges may give an edge to specified English/Language Arts courses, rather than integrated ELA courses. This would be more likely for a homeschool graduate who is aiming for an English, literature, communications or humanities major. (You can check this on the college website or by contacting the admissions office at the college. It is also a good question to ask on college visits.)

So, if you have a non-college-bound homeschool high schooler, specific ELA courses may not be necessary (unless you are in a state that requires specific courses to be listed). In many cases, you can simply record on the transcript:

  • For 9th grade: English/Language Arts 1 (or ELA 1, English 1, Language Arts 1…it is your choice)
  • For 10th grade: English/Language Arts 2
  • For 11th grade: English/Language Arts 3
  • For 12th grade: English/Language Arts 4
  • OR you may instead, specify the literature course that each year’s ELA credit is built around (for instance, American Literature, British Literature, World Literature, Great Christian Writers Literature, etc).

If you you have a college-bound homeschool high schooler who is headed for a college that does not need specific ELA courses to be listed, follow the same guidelines as the non-college-bound teens.

(Unless you are in a state where the specific courses DO need to be listed.)

Be sure on the transcript to show the level of rigor that your homeschool high schooler has earned for each ELA (and other core courses).

Now, if you are in a state where the type of literature each year’s English/Language Arts course must be listed on the transcript, or are aiming for a college that would like to see this, you have a couple of choices.

Choice #1:

Choose a specific literature course for each high school year. We, of course, are partial to 7Sisters’ no-busywork, level-able, teen-vetted literature courses:

(7Sisters Literature Study Guides in the Literature courses contain vocabulary from the book. This is sufficient for many teens, however, if your teen is aiming for more competitive colleges, supplement with a vocabulary course or FreeRice.com, a fun vocabulary-building game.)

Of course, along with the the literature course, your homeschool high schooler will need writing. Again, we are partial to 7Sisters no-busywork, level-able, teen-vetted writing courses. Our courses contain the writing genres and lessons that build comfortably through each year until they reach college-readiness.

Homeschool high schoolers should also include some grammar studies in their writing. For many teens, simply learning good editing skills is enough for their goals. Editing is built into 7Sisters guides. However, some teens really need a grammar checker to help them learn writing skills. We suggest Grammar Granules.

A number of colleges want to see at least a little of some kind of speech also. We, of course, are fans of 7Sisters fun Speech curriculum.

All of these together create the specific Literature course (which implies that writing, vocabulary, grammar and speech are included).

Choice #2

Use an integrated curriculum. An integrated curriculum has a little American Literature, World Literature, British Literature, and another Literature mixed through the year, each year. This is a good choice for teens who will get bored with one literature topic for the entire year.

Integrated curriculums often also include the required writing, vocabulary, grammar and speech components so that homeschool moms do not need to shop for a bunch of extra curriculum. 7Sisters ELA Bundles are an example of integrated ELA curriculum (they also include schedules to help your teen know what to study and when). The ELA Bundles cover:

The ELA bundles have all three state-required Literature topics (for the states that require American, British and World Literatures). However the topics are sprinkled through each bundle. (This is similar to the Integrated Math 1, 2 and 3 that many high schools use, where Algebra 1 and 2 along with Geometry and Trigonometry are sprinkled throughout each year.)

To record this on the transcript, you could handle it in several ways (if you have a local supervising organization, they may be may have some guidelines they prefer).

Here are two ways to handle the integrated ELA:

You could record on the transcript:
9th Grade: ELA 1 (including American, British and World Literature)
10th Grade: ELA 2 (including American, British and World Literature)
11th Grade: ELA 3 (including American, British and World Literature)
12th Grade: ELA 4 (including American, British and World Literature)
(We suggest keeping your syllabus in case you had a college ask about it.)
OR you could record on the transcript:
  • 9th Grade: .25 credit each of American Literature, British Literature, World Literature, Great Christian Writers (or General Literature)
  • 10th Grade: .25 credit each of American Literature, British Literature, World Literature, Great Christian Writers (or General Literature)
  • 11th Grade: .25 credit each of American Literature, British Literature, World Literature, Great Christian Writers (or General Literature)
  • 12th Grade: .25 credit each of American Literature, British Literature, World Literature, Great Christian Writers (or General Literature)
  • This will total a full credit in each by graduation

For more on record keeping for homeschool high school, check out this post.

As you know, there’s not ONE right way to homeschool high school, so you handle recording ELA on the transcript in the way that best fits your teens needs! (In fact, you can create your own course, like our friend, Betsy, did.)

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How to Homeschool High School: How to Record ELA on the Transcript

Vicki Tillman

Blogger, curriculum developer at 7SistersHomeschool.com, counselor, life and career coach, SYMBIS guide, speaker, prayer person. 20+year veteran homeschool mom.

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